The American Influence on Japan in the 1800’s

1 Nov

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So I decided to stray a way from the historiography this week and focus on Japan a little, since I have a midterm coming up in a class which is dedicated to the modernization of Japan from the time of the shogunates, to now. Japan went through many changes from the 1700’s to the 1800’s due to the push of American trade, and the cry for power of its citizens. For the longest time Japan was set up as a feudal system with Japan being divided into sectors or clans. Each clan had a daimyo in charge. That daimyo was dedicated to only his people and would abide by the law of the shogunate who were the military leaders. Now there was an emperor but he had no real authority over the people. 

For some time they had decided to seclude themselves from the rest of the world in order to secure their traditions. The only group they stayed in contact with were the dutch, who were not a threat. It wasn’t until the west sent Commodore Perry over to Japan with a note inscribing the interest of trade with Japan. If they did not open up their doors to them, they would be fired upon. Seeing as how they could not afford an attack from the U.S. they signed any treaty given to avoid war. This caused uproar from the citizens because many of the treaties were found to be embarrassing to Japan and caused them to be subordinate to every nation. The Meijji Revolution was then put into play. 

The Meiji Revolution was the rise of the Emperor Meijji, (who was only 16 at the time), over the shogunate. This uprising was started by the Samurai and was widely supported by the people. In putting the Emperor at the head of Japan, they would then have a central power and establish a parliamentary government to run with a constitution. In doing this they hope to strengthen Japan and get them out of the position the original shogunate put them in.  

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Reflection

6 Jun

Since this quarter and class are ending, it is time to wrap up the blogging.  I actually had a blast finding things to post. That is, when I didn’t forget.  There were so many cool blogs about popular culture, new discoveries that are being made, and old discoveries that were new to learn about.  I was glad to have learned more about the different things that class was not able to cover because of time constraints.  This blogging discussion was definitely awesome. -Amber

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Reflection

5 Jun

Reflection

So this quarter and class is coming to a close, I can honestly say that I had more fun with these blogs than I thought I would. At first I thought it would be a bother but when our group started to have a more nerdy/pop culture theme to our blog posts it really got interesting. overall I said that atleast this aspect of the online work was really enjoyable

-Brian Bayot

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Sobek

3 Jun

Sobek

Sobek, the god who resembles a crocodile, was inspiration for this comic villain. The 52 (not the New 52) introduced Sobek as a villain during week 26. He pretends not to know who he is and is befriended and brought into the Black Marvel Family. Although he acts like he does not have a name, it is later found out that he is Yurrd the Unknown, who is one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. So, Sobek was inspired by Egyptian gods and then his character changes to one inspired by Christianity. His Egyptian career was not long-lived.

-Amber

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Prehistoric Egyptian Jewelery

3 Jun

Prehistoric Egyptian Jewelery

Researcher have found a bead made of iron from meteorite. The bead dates back to around 3,300 BC. Which makes this bead so interesting is that the first record of iron smelting in the region doesn’t occur until thousands of years later, which is some time in the 6th century.

Alex Z

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/maps.12120/abstract

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Cleopatra a Magical Girl?

29 May

Cleopatra a Magical Girl?

The anime Madoka Magica came out last year and was a pretty big success for its alternate direction in the japanese anime genre of Mahou Shoujou or magical girls (along the likes of Sailor Moon or Cardcaptor Sakura, and Precure). One of the scenes towards the end of the series was showing a history of magical girls in the shows universe and showed several historical figures who were magical girls such as Joan of arc and, pictured here, Cleopatra.

Its kind of a mixed reaction seeing a historical figure being a magical girl that fights against bad guys or whatever but at the same time it kinda shows a bit of a”These girls were only great cause they had magic” idea.

personally I didn’t like the show in the end but seeing this part in the show was a hilarious concept as a person who watches anime in general.

-Brian Bayot

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Om Nom Visits Ancient Egypt

25 May

Cut the Rope is one of those addicting apps that is available online and on those smart devices. Now, there is Cut the Rope: Time Travel. Om Nom is trying to get candy for himself and one for his relatives throughout different points of history. He travels to the Renaissance, the Middle Ages, ancient Egypt, ancient Greece, the Stone Age and a pirate ship. The candy in these Ancient Egypt levels sometimes have wings and fly. Perhaps they are supposed to be the wings of Horus. Is there any form of popular culture that is safe from the influence of ancient Egypt?

-Amber

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Buffy the Vampire Slayer

23 May

In season five of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” the episode titled “Shadow” uses an Egyptian religion reference. Buffy is trying to stop this lady from finding the ‘key’ and this lady is stopping at nothing to get the key. This lady uses a spell from the cult of Sobek. Giles informs Buffy, Xander and Willow that Sobek is a reptilian god, which does not even fully grasp who Sobek was to the Egyptians. Now, this is pretty much the only reference in the entire episode but it is a fun one. She turns a tiny snake into a giant cobra-like monster with eyes that light up. This is an episode that shows that television likes to take elements from our histories that are fascinating and make them their own.

-Amber

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Curse of King Rameses

22 May

A cartoon back in the day there was a show on cartoon network known as Courage the Cowardly Dog which was of a Dog and his owners Muriel and Eustice living in The Middle of Nowhere USA, where they experience all sorts of creepy happenings in every episode. One episode in particular was The Curse if King Rameses where they stumble across a slab stolen from the tomb of King Rameses ,to which the thiefs at the start of the episode met a horrible fate due to a curse. The overall episode was how courage was trying to save Muriel and Eustice from the Curses of Rameses who demands that they “Return the slab or suffer my curse” to which they suffer partly due to Eustice wanting to sell the slab for large amounts of cash. One of the highlights was one of the curses being a really catchy song which is posted here for your pleasure.

-Brian Bayot

16 May

Egypt in Total War: Rome.

By Jeffrey D. Johnson

Games like Total War: Rome are great for fans of history.  The game allows the players to run, almost as a god, a culture in the ancient world circa 270 BC or 483 AUC. But in regards to its playable factions it has caused some trouble for itself.

Egypt is a playable faction and gives lovers of history some problems. At the time the game is set Egypt was under control of the Ptolemys. The Ptolemys were Macedonians and probably used Macedonian style armies.  We know they used Greek style buildings.

The problem is that in the game the units used by the Egyptian faction look like the type of solder that would have been used before the Ptolemaic takeover.  Even worse, for some, the buildings are built with the Egyptian style when they should probably be a mix. We know that the Ptolemys adapted to Egyptian culture, but there is no evidence that they adapted that much.

While to most people these problems are trivial, they do raise a good point. This problem serves as a good example of the problem between Historical fact and popular belief.  Many people not familiar with history have a mental image of what Egyptian culture looked like that probably has more to do with the mummy movies than reality.  And the portrayal of Egypt is not wholly inaccurate inaccurate Egypt probably looked and fought as depicted during the New Kingdom. so the creators did give historically accurate Egyptians, as best they could, but just from a different period of time.  One in which more lay people are familiar.

For the most part fans of the game have had to put up with the issue going unresolved.  The game is what it is and most people realize that many of the games problems were the result of its creators having to put up with limitations set by the technology they used. So why is this relevant?  The creators are remaking the game are deliberately trying to be more in depth and accurate than before.

So this little question has been brought back from the dust bin.  Should creators aim for the historical accurate Greco-Egyptian culture of the time, or should they stick to Egypt as most people perceive it?